Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Kite Runner Fishbowl: Chapter 23

Mr. Dodson, Senior Military Adviser to the Afghan Army'sNational Threat Warning Center, sent us this picture from Kabul (underneath is a quote from his e-mail):


"From Afghanistan - a country of everlasting conflicts and unending vendettas."
--G.J. Younghusband


Feel free to comment on the picture as you blog, and I hope you enjoy our final fishbowl discussion of The Kite Runner! Continue with your usual level of depth and professionalism, and try to include a passage from the text in at least one of your comments.

109 comments:

Nicole said...

His relationship with Farid is what his relationship with Hassan would have been if there were no statuses.

Liap said...

Farid is similar to Hassan in that he is of a lower class than Amir, and they have both been loyal and trustworthy towards him.

AprilH said...

Amir and Farid's relationship compares with the relationship he has with Hassan is because they both have gone through a journey together. Also at one point Farid says, "For you a thousand times over." Which reminds Amir of Hassan. Another comparison is Farid has done so much for Amir by helping him out.

Macy said...

Farid and Hassan both are in a lower class and they are also loyal to each other, those are the main similarites.

RachelK said...

Amir definitely didn't deserve to be rescued from Assef. He didn't rescue or stand up for Hassan, so at the time, he might've been thinking "Why should I be rescued?"

allison t said...

I agree with Lia that Farid is similar to Hassan because they are both lower classes and that they are/were both extremely loyal to him. Also, to answer the question about Amir's lip, I think that it reminds him of Hassan and there will always be reminders of him, he will never forget.

Liap said...

I think that Amir's lip getting cut was a way for Hassan to live through Amir. I think the author meant for this injury to be a reminder of Hassan, and to show how deeply he and Amir were connected.

elizabeth k said...

I agree with Lia. she says that Farid is like Hassan. I agree because they both are extremely trustworthy and great to Amir and they are both in a lower social class.

Emma said...

I agree with Nicole his friendship with Hassan and Farid are similar, he just doesn't feel held back from being good friends with him because there's no status difference. Also I think that Farid reminds him of Hassan a little. At the hospital Farid says, "For you, a thousand times over" making Amir cry.

ellenj said...

I think that it is important that Amir aknowleges that his lip was cut right down the middle, and when he's haying in the hospital he says its "just like a harelip" which Hassan had. I agree with Jamie that it will always remind him of Hassan.

Aaron H. said...

Amir's injury is like Hassan and now he can live up to Hassan by standing up to Assef just like Hassan did.

Nicole said...

I agree with Jamie in a way. The cut on his lip is sort of like a symbol that Hassan will always be with him.
But I also think it is like the mark that a piece of Hassan lives in Amir.

AprilH said...

I think the scar on his lip symbolizes Hassan and how Hassan will always be there with him in is mind and in spirit.

RachelK said...

It is very interesting about Amir's scar. The scar reminds him of the harelip Hassan got. Amir probably deserved what he got.

Nicole said...

I agree with Jason. I think Rahim lied about the family because if he had told Amir to take him home it would be less likely for Amir to save Sohrab.

ellenj said...

I agree with Jason that Rahim Khan lied to Amir to force him to go to get Sohrab. I think that he was trying to give Amir some courage and show him that he is capable of being brave and saving someone important, he just needed to be pushed into it.

Liap said...

I agree with Nile that memory and the past are reoccuring ideas in the book. The author uses these concepts several times when he is reflecting on his life, or hearing about Hassan.

JeniC said...

Although this may seem of topic, on page 297 a pigeon is mentioned. I've noticed that this is not the only time pigeons are mentioned, they are brought up many time (usualy about them pecking at something). Do you think that they symbolize anything?

Allie~J said...

I think that because he got cut down the middle of his lip shows that he has become more like Hassan and now is nicer and knows that he has finally become what he has always wanted to be. Hes not selfish and hes finally completed his his lifes journey

RachelK said...

I agree with Lia about the connection between Hassan and Amir through the scar. It connects deeply and back to their pasts as well.

KaleighD said...

I agree with Lia, I think that the author mentioned a hairlip as a reminder of Hassan and is a way of bringing him back.

BrianW said...

I agree with Jason because all the news was shocking to him already, and now finding out he has to take care of his nephew.

georged said...

Amir's lip being cut looking just like Hassan's is very symbolic. After this incident, and after rescuing Hassan's son, he has become much closer to Hassan than he ever was by being good like him rather than being the bad force in their relationship. Even though Hassan is gone, this injury serves as a permanent reminder of his friend and brother. Now, he can no longer hide from his past and has no reason to.

Emma said...

I think that Rahim lied to Amir about the orphanage because he wanted to make sure that Amir would go. He probably wouldn't have gone if he knew there was no family. I think that Rahim knew that once Amir got to know Sohrab he would take care of him because he knew Sohrab would remind him of Hassan. So I think that lie was a way for him to ensure that Amir would go and get him.

Nicole said...

I agree with Meghan, Amir knows who he is NOW but not THEN. Then, he was so overridden with guilt that he couldn't be himself.
But in releasing that guilt, he can finally be free.

elizabeth k said...

I agree with Nile when he says that Amirs scar on his lip is a constant reminder of Hassan. I think this is a good and a bad thing. It's good for him to remember it because I think that it reminds him to treat people they way he wishes he would have treated Hassan. On the other hand I think this is a bad thing because it's a constant hurting.

AprilH said...

I think Amir does know who is. At one point in the book he realizes that he is a coward and that he does run away from problems in his life. I agree with Sam when she says that he is hurting everywhere physically and mentally.

RachelK said...

I agree with Meghan. Amir might've been afraid of accepting who he really was, and now that he had been so badly beaten by Assef, he is more at peace knowing that what happened to him he deserved.

Allie~J said...

I think AMir finally knows who he actually is. Before he didn't andit was blurry too. He wasn't at peace with himself andnow he is. I agree with Megan because Amir finally has found his true self and is happy with it.

Aaron H. said...

In the hero's journey all heros have some sort of a mentor. Amir's mentor in Rahim. And Rahim had to push Amir a little in the right direction.

Macy said...

I agree with Brian and Jaason because all the news was so suprising and now that he finds out that he must take care of his nephew, he is just shocked.

Nicole said...

Hassan probably told Rahim about the rape because he knew Rahim wouldn't do something irrational from that knowledge. Hassan could have told him to ask Rahim for advice on what to do.

allison t said...

I think that Rahim didn't help Hassan and Amir when Hassan told him about the rape because he wanted Amir and Hassan to take care of the situation themselves.

ellenj said...

I agree with Shea that Hassan wanted Amir to take some responsibility, and he hoped that someday they could re-unite and talk about it and forgive eachother. Since that was not possible, I think that Rahim shares the letters to show Amir what Hassan had wanted and help Amir understand what was really going on.

elizabeth k said...

I think the bear could represent overcoming fears and the strength of the characters.

Liap said...

I agree with Emma that the family was just a way to get Amir to go in the first place. I think that Rahim was confident that Amir would change and want to take care of the boy. Also, I think that the bear symbolizes Baba, but also what Baba stood for: strength, courage, and perserverance.

AprilH said...

I agree with Nile. The bear is showing that they are battling something in their life that is hard to overcome. It's a struggle for them but they eventually overcome and win the battle.

Allie~J said...

Well with the bear and Baba, in the beggining of the book wasn't there a story that said that Baba fought a bear and nobody ever asked if that really happened. Also now Amir may relize that after all these years hes finally become a mix of Baba and Hassan and Ali which makes him him.

JeniC said...

Nicole, you said "But in releasing that guilt, he can finally be free". It sounds like you are almost talking about redepmtion. I have found so many quotes in the last few chapters about redemption. One that I found in this chapter was when Amir was telling Farid about his fight for Assef, "Let's just say we both got what we deserved" (298). Redemption is such a large motif in this book.

Emma said...

I agree with George, I think that the bear was supposed to symbolize something. I think that Amir is still troubled by his fathers death and he has not let go yet. Also I think that Amir is a lot like Baba since he also learned from Rahim that they were both very troubled people and felt they needed to make up for their mistakes. I think that the dream represents how similar Amir and Baba are.

ellenj said...

I agree that Amir is realizing that he doesn't need words to express himself amymore, but I still do not understand why he allowed Sohrab, whose a kid, to save him. Was this supposed to be a connection to Hassan always standing up for Amir and helping him and taking blame for Amir?

elizabeth k said...

I agree with Mrs. Leclaire that the phisical release of his emotions are a good thing for him. it shows all of the emotions that he wanted to get out for all of these years.

Macy said...

I agree with April and Nile. A bear is a symbol of a struggle or an obsticle in their life. It represents getting over fears.

Allie~J said...

I disagree with Annie because Amir is the man that Baba wanted him tobe in the sense that he may not have fought back but Baba always took what he deserved and now Amir is but also Amir is finally learning who he is and thats all that Baba ever wanted form him I think.

Aaron H. said...

I think Amir really messed up and now that he has confronted Assef and ultimatly his guilt and his mistake, and now Amir is now at peace with himself.

KaleighD said...

I think that Amir feels guilty because he treated Hassan so poorly and I think that if he knew Hassan was his brother then he would have probably treated Hassan with more respect.

michellev said...

I agree with Jason that he does feel guilty and he was gonna feel guilty, but I also feel he was to hard on himself, but he still should have told someone, it would have made things better. I also agree with Jake that he should have let it out because he knew what was right from wrong, Amir knew telling was right but he held himself in from telling anyone.

Emma said...

I agree with Jeni, redemption is a huge theme in this book. Both Baba and Rahim felt they needed to redeem themselves so they tried to do good things to make up for their mistakes. Redemtion is represented all throughout this story.

RachelK said...

I agree with Jason that Amir feels guilty not in a physical way, but of a choice he made. I agree with Nicole when she says that at the time, the only thing Amir knew what to do at the moment was to keep in it, not telling anybody. Again, I agree with Jason that Amir is afraid of himself. He's afraid of facing his past.

ellenj said...

I disagree with Jason, i think that Amir does have things to be guilty for. I think that he IS physically guilty, and i think that it's right that he was feeling guilt. He knew he had done something wrong, by not helping he best friend. I think that he has finally find a way, after all these years to get it out, which is good. But i still think that he deserved to feel guilt for not respecting his and Hassan's friendship and really hurting his only friend.

elizabeth k said...

I agree with Aaron. Amir is finally at peace with himself. He made things right with Rahim Kahn and he is finally getting the sense of inner peace

Liap said...

I agree with Allie. I think though Baba didn't EXPECT Amir to be the kind of person he is before he was born, but I think Baba WANTED him to turn out a good man and that is exactly what happened. I think in the end Baba accepted who Ali was and loved him even more for it.

AprilH said...

I agree with Elizabeth and Mrs. Leclaire. Amir is finally releasing all of his anger or feelings that he had had for a long time. He is starting to feel better about himself and feels like he can defend himself better now. I think his strength is starting to come out.

nilec said...

I agree with Aaron. I think it took Amir confronting all the things that haunted him as a child, including Assef, to become a man and be at peace.

allison t said...

Rahim Khan was right that Amir was too hard on himself after the rape, but I don't think Amir was guilty of witnessing it I think he was guilty of not doing anything about it for his best friend that had stood up for him so many times before. I also think that he is a coward and he hasn't changed nor will he ever change if he still can't stand up for himself or the people he loves.

georged said...

Unrelated to the discussion, I found Rahim Khan's letter very interesting because of what it showed about his character. Through most of this story we see Rahim as the good role model for Amir who was always nice compared to Baba. However, I think that Rahim has taken the cowards way out with his lies. If he had been brave and done the honest and honorable thing, he would have told the truth to Amir rather than waiting towards the end of his life. By finally explaining this to Amir, this is his way of "being good again." Unfortunately, Rahim had to live with his lie for most of his life, making him similar to Amir in that respect. At the end of his letter, he says he is going away, presumably to die. This also seems cowardly because he is going where he will not have to face Amir, therefore his past, again. I suppose Rahim Khan and Amir have a lot in common. Were this not being graded, I would point out the possible conspiracy that Rahim Khan is Amir's real father, but that is a whole different topic.

KaleighD said...

I agree with Jason when he says that Amir is to afraid of himself because I think that rather than try to deal with everything that has happened in his past and with Hassan, he runs away from it.He tried to run to America to get away from the memories of what has happened in Afghanistan.

BrianW said...

I think that Hassan felt embarrassed about what happened, so Amir never wanted to bring it up but he felt like he needed to keep their friendship.

ellenj said...

I agree with Meghan that Amir not being alone anymore, will really help him. I think that now that he has in some way made a lot of his guilt go away, it will help him to have something like Sohrab who represents his past, even though he tried to hard to bury it in America.

Aaron H. said...

Amir didn't talk about what happened because he was afraid and disappointed in himself. Amir didn't deal with the problem and instead he just covered it up until these last couple of chapters.

JeniC said...

I agree with Jason, that Amir not telling anyone about the rape was self denial. Amir tried to make himself believe that it had never happen through self denial. He thought that he would feel better if he could believed that Hassan was never raped.

RachelK said...

George- that's a good idea (about Rahim's letter).

Aaron H. said...

Amir could have run and got help. But instead Amir forced Hassan away because Hassan made Amir feel guilty.

allison t said...

I agree with Annie that things would have been different if Amir at least TRIED to help Hassan while he was getting raped. Like the old saying, "It's the thought that counts" and I think that's all Hassan ever wanted.

Emma said...

I agree with Jake, Assef never felt any guilt for any of the things he did but Amir did. Assef was bragging about how good he felt going door to door killing Hazaras. A person like that feels no guilt but Amir actually felt really guilty about what he did so I don't think that they are very similar.

nilec said...

I was confused when Amir compared himself to Assef. At a point in the story when things begin to look positive why would he think so horribly of himself? Is he still just being too hard on himself?

Macy said...

I agree with Ellen. If he's alone, he won't get over the guilt as easily. I think Sorab will make a difference in his life.

RachelK said...

I agree with what Allison said. It would've been a bit different if Amir had at least TRIED to help Hassan. But like Jason said, if none of this had/hadn't happened, there would be no book.

KaleighD said...

I agree with Jeni, Amir's way of dealing with his past is self deinal. He acts as if nothing had happened with Hassan and that's why i think he doesn't tell Soraya about his past because he just tries to forget about it, but bringing it up and talking about it makes it seem more real

allison t said...

I think that it was Amir that ruined his and Hassan's friendship because Hassan tried many times after the rape to keep their friendship the way it had always been but it was Amir that changed everything and planted the money and the watch and basically forced them to leave in the first place.

RachelK said...

Nile-- I think that Amir knows that he's caused harm in some way. Not necessarily like Assef, but Amir did kind of let himself think that his and Hassan's friendship was going down the drain (sacrificing a friendship). Just a thought.

Allie~J said...

I agree with Nile that some lies have to be said but they make things for the better and not the worse. Because not all lies are bad ones.

JeniC said...

Relating to the hero's journey, I found conflicting messages about Amir's journey in this chapter. On page 301 is a quote from Rahim's letter to Amir, "I hope your suffering comes to an end with this journey to Afghanistan" (301). I saw this almost as the end of Amir's "hero's journey". Yet on page 307 there is a quote from Amir's dream about Assef, "We're the same, you and I,...You nursed with him, but you're my twin" (307). I felt like this shows that Amir didn't feel redemed and that he had barely started his journey. These quotes confused me, they are such opposites.

Aaron H. said...

Nile- I think that Amir is being hard on himself and that he is having trouble forgiving himself. I think Amir regrets what he did to Hassan.

georged said...

Something I just noticed that many of the dreams have in common is Amir picturing himself as the villain. Amir corrects Hassan's dream to say that he himself was the monster in the lake that dragged Hassan to the bottom. Amir dreams that he is the Talib that actually kills Hassan. He also dreams that he is the one who wrestles the bear. This shows how he takes personal responsibility for a lot of things, but also the representation of him trying to come to grips with and understand his past.

17thasafs said...

Hi,

I enjoyed reading your comments. If I might, Hassan was half Hazara, which in Afghanistan is looked down upon for two reasons, first they are Shia Muslims in a country predominately Sunni and second, they are decedents of Genghis Khan. The second reason is important because they all have Asian features, thus they are easily identified. The rest of the Afghans still carry a great deal of animosity toward them because of the slaughter that occurred when Khan went through Afghanistan.

To be "tarred" with the label Hazara is one of the ultimate put downs there is here today. Thus, Amir, who is from an upper class has to confront his lower class sibling. Is class, as noted by a number of you, still important?

17thasafs said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
alenav said...

Classes are still of huge importance today. Even though we all say that we don't care about them, but in reality they surround us and probably always will. When we look at someone we constantly judge them by the way they dress, act, how much money they have, race, background, etc. Without even realizing it they determine a lot.

Nicole said...

Since we all grew up in America, class is not consiously important. Or it's not thought about in a degrading manner as often. However, we still have our social statuses in High-school. Popular vs. non-polular. In the outside world you have the heirarchy of jobs. Manager, assistant manager, etc.

samh said...

I think that the labels of class are still present, but I personally do not find it important. We should not judge people based on class, people are people no matter what class they are in. We need to look deeper into people and not just judge them based on their appearence or class.

adamc said...

Yes because even here in America most rich people won't even associate with the poor because it is all about how other people see you and I can't see that ever changing.

JasonV said...

I feel that class is still important because it is a basis for organized society and it helps people have achievable goals etc. When people take too much of the power alloted to them and abuse it, that is where problems arise, not from the class structure as a whole, but from some people in those respective classes.

KatieW said...

To me class is not important, but I think it is important to a lot of people here. I think it matters most to people who have big time jobs and compete in business for money. Maybe business people care about it more than kids in school because they care about money, while kids just care about friends and usually won't benefit or be brought down by the type of class their friend is in.

ellenj said...

I do not think it is as important in our society here today as it is in Afganistan. Most people in American have moved on from the ideas about the bad things rich people used to do to them. I think that it has some importance, but it's nothing like Afganistan or what it used to be. Since not everyone emphasizes it, it isn't so important. Poeple can be friends with anyone from any class and people can also "move up" in class or make something better of themselves.

jamieG said...

Social classes will ALWAYS be an issue no matter where you are in the world. Although it isn't highly respected, sterio types are common and still used to there full extent, if not more than they were 3 years ago.

JeniC said...

Personally, I do not view social classes as being extremely important in current soiety. However, I do believe that a person's class is still noted when encountering others.

RachelK said...

I think class is still huge in our society today. We all define ourselves as different people, different styles, religions, personalities, etc. However, class shouldn't get in the way of a strong friendship. Although, in Kite Runner, Hassan is looked down upon because of his class, it still shouldn't mean that him and Amir can't be friends/care eachother. In another way, I think Amir was also afraid of caring for and befriending Hassan because of his class. I guess it all depends on how you look at it that affects our actions.

AprilH said...

I think that class is still a big label here today. Some people won't be friends or associate with others who are a different class. Class is a way you live in a way and some people sadly judge by that. So I guess where ever you go there will always be different classes.

Aaron H. said...

I think that classes are still apart of our society. People steriotype and judge other people based on their social class. And it also defines us.

NowlanS said...

Class, in today's society, is present but is not as repressive as it used to be. Classes still exist and will continue to exist, but here classes are not destructive to society and do not repress most people. Our society and all societies have a social structure and classes, but in today's society these classes are not as distinct and harmful as they have been in the past.

Mark W said...

I don't think that social classes have much of an impact here in America. There are some incidents in which upper classes feel like they have more authority than lower class, but it doesn't have a huge effect. For the most part, we treat everyone equally and with respect.

meghank said...

I think that class is still somewhat important in our society today but more and more it is beginning to not matter as much. The only thing that really makes it important is that it defines what kind of life you live, where you go to school, how big of a house you live in, and in some cases what job you have. Although this is true America is one of a few places that there is opportunity here and no matter what class you are born into you are always able to make your life better and move classes.

Liap said...

I believe that class is still very important in our and most other societies is very important.I think a lot of people pay way too much attention to the amount of money people make, and the way or places they were raised in and judge them harshly because of it. I think that though there are no formal classes ini our society, there are still the ones that people make themselves see.

Allie~J said...

Classes sadly are still a big part of our society and of high school. Many students tend to hang out with otheres who have around the same price of things but then there are exceptions as always. But really I don't think there should be any classes but I don't think the rich should be punished and the poor rewarded. I think we still need classes but classes shouldn't matter who you hang out with and who you talk to.

allison t said...

I think that social class has a little bit of an influence in the United States, but it's not a huge deal. For example, as a society, we frown upon homeless and poorer people, but we don't enslave them or hold back their rights. They have just as much of a chance to go to school and get a job or education as more well-off people do.

michellev said...

I think class is a big issue here, the way the rich with huge houses are compared to someone with a rundown house, they would never be friends because the upper class usually think they are better than lower class. So I believe class is important.

Shay N said...

Class is a huge part of society; people are so closed minded that they will avoid people who don’t have as much money as them and can’t ever see themselves being friends will a poorer person. They don’t even try to talk to people with less money because they would be judged by their other friends and maybe even considered to be more like the poorer person.

Emma said...

I think that in some places class is still fairly important but i dont think it is nearly as important as it used to be. There will allways be people who feel that others are less important and will feel that there should be clases. We will never be able to completely get rid of that. Even though a lot less people feel this way there will allways be some people who do.

Jake H said...

I don't think that class is as big of an issue. We have realized that everyone is different and that no class will be able to classify every single person. In America, people have realized that not one class is superior. However, I am not saying that we don't have people who believe that some people think they are superior. It is just not as common.

ddenton76 said...

Yes I do think that class does determine how you are looked upon. You can tell what class somebody is by the way they look and if you look like a lower class person than you will get treated like a lower class person if you look like an upper class person than you will get treated like one and you will probably get more respect than a lower class person. So yes classes play a very big role in today’s society.

RachelK said...

But, however, it doesn't seem like a huge deal in America anymore.

Macy said...

Just like in Afganistan, here in America we have levels/classes too. Especially at school where people are judged on a daily basis. People judge on race, clothing, how much money you have, where you live etc. No matter how hard we try to stay away from this, I don't think it will ever go away.

nilec said...

I disagree with the use of classes and don't think it is all that important. The only thing that makes the system of classes relevant is the close-mindedness of those who participate in the system. If people would be willing to welcome everyone as equal they would realize that classes isn't the only, or the most satifactory way to live.

annies said...

I don't think the "class" labels are huge but they do matter. Classes also don't really matter because people can move up in their society in America, no matter how they look, or how rich they are or their parents were. In Kite Runner, Hassan couldn't move up in the social classes because he was a Hazara, but if he would have gone to America with Amir and Baba, he could have become successful and he wouldn't have to be killed for being a Hazara.

BrianW said...

I’m surprised that this is such a big deal in Afghanistan; I have always thought that I wouldn’t really mater there since it doesn’t matter here in America. I just have never thought of class being a really big issue.

KaleighD said...

I think that class is still an important aspect in one's life in all places, some more than others. Even though it's still important in society, it't not as important as it used to be.People everywhere are judged based on their class and that will never stop, but the differences between classes aren't as great as they used to be.

georged said...

In an idealistic sense, a classless society would have its advantages. In theory, it would eliminate greed and persecution, yet we have seen that both of those are inevitable. With our capitalist system, an economic classed society is the natural tendency. Some people will get ahead and others will fall behind and nothing short of communism can stop that. Even then, as history shows, communism is unsustainable. As is such, for better or worse, we will have a classed society.

However, often the larger issue is a class system based on ethnicity as you mentioned about Afghanistan. Obviously there, class is still important, though it should not and does not have to be. It is difficult to change people's history and do not forget easily. If the people really want change, they work towards it and generally achieve it. If the current democracy in Afghanistan is sustained, change will come to help the race issue, albeit slowly. Racial classes are still important only because they do exist and cannot be ignored.

robd said...

Hi,

I enjoyed reading your responses to my question on class. From this part of the world, class plays a very important role, in Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, etc. But the class levels are also based on religion and ethnicity (tribes, clans and families). While we in American tend to overlook class (a benefit of our individualism and the belief that anyone can achieve) we still have labels.

A big part of the separation between groups in Afghanistan is the geography of the country and lack of development. There is one road that circles the country, called the ring road. In the north it is closed during parts of the winter because of the snow. The mountains tend to isolate the groups and add to the separation of classes. So one of the things that made American overcome, to a degree, the ability to blend classes still exits here - that is the development of the country. However, as many of you pointed out, the personal issues still exist and thus, it would appear there will always be "groupings" which tend to end up as class...as George Orwell said in Animal Farm, all animals are created equal, however some are created more equal than others (in that someone has to be in charge or chaos rules).

Cheers,
Rob

NowlanS said...

Amir shows part of his character that he wants to good in this chapter. He wants redemption for all the wrong he has done. He feels as if he is responsible for Hassan's death and needs redemption for that in some way. He sees that redemption in Sohrab. He is hesitant to rescue Sohrab and mainly agrees to find him as "a way to be good again." Rahim uses Amir's guilt to persuade Amir to rescue Sohrab.

It is quite interesting that in order for Amir to rescue Sohrab that he had to go through Assef. Assef says that if Amir makes it out alive that he earned his escape. This further shows that running away from your fears do not accomplish anything. Some time and some day your fears will have to be faced. Amir has to survive the beatings of Assef to save Sohrab. This symbolizes the pain that Hassan had to go through. For once it was Amir saving Sohrab, which was like saving Hassan, instead of Amir being the one being rescued or the one running away. Also Amir ended up with the split lips that looked a lot like the hair lip Hassan had.

Also the phrase,"For you a thousand times over" is repeated throughout the book. This phrase was always said to Amir and when Farid says this to him in the hospital it is symbolic of Hassan's forgiveness to Amir ad of redemption. Amir stould up fro himself and for Hassan and Sohrab against Assef, who had not changed since their childhood.